NAVEX Global Expands Contact Center Operations in Idaho as the Company Continues to Grow

NAVEX Global Expands Contact Center Operations in Idaho as the Company Continues to Grow

NAVEX Global Expands Contact Center Operations in Idaho as the Company Continues to Grow

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PORTLAND, Ore.Leading ethics and compliance software and services company NAVEX Global® today announced that it will expand its operations in Rexburg, Idaho, to meet the demands of the company’s rapidly growing business and expanding global customer base.

NAVEX Global is the world’s largest provider of whistleblower hotlines and operates contact centers in Charlotte, North Carolina, Norcross, Georgia, and Lisbon, Portugal. The company expects to add between 80 and 100 new employees to staff a new contact center in Rexburg. Employees at the 3,630-square-foot contact center, located at 36 Professional Plaza, will field calls from NAVEX Global’s Incident Reporting Hotline and administer business-to-business insurance claims for NAVEX Global’s NetClaim business unit. The company will also add approximately four new pre-sales positions to support the company’s core business. NAVEX Global currently employs approximately 50 sales, services and software development people in Rexburg at its 346 Grand Loop office. The two offices are within a mile of each other near the campus of Brigham Young University-Idaho.

NAVEX Global has already begun recruiting for the contact center in Rexburg and is currently accepting job applications. The final employment number will depend on the number of employees who apply for part-time positions, which might be more appealing to busy college students. Training for new employees will begin in mid-May. The contact center will begin operations in early June.

“NAVEX Global’s presence in this community began in 2013 with the acquisition of PolicyTech, a high-growth software company founded here in Rexburg,” said Bob Conlin, NAVEX Global president and CEO. “The employees we gained through that acquisition have contributed significantly to our growth and our culture, and we have been looking for an opportunity to expand operations in this area for some time.”

Among the several positive aspects of the Rexburg location is the concentration of potential job applicants with multilingual skills, in part due to the proximity of BYU-Idaho. NAVEX Global’s international business growth has accelerated in recent years, necessitating a commensurate expansion in multilingual contact center staffing.

“It is with great excitement, but not surprise, that the City of Rexburg announces the expansion of NAVEX Global in our community,” said Rexburg Mayor Jerry L. Merrill. “NAVEX Global, a very forward-thinking company, joins the growing number of businesses that recognize Rexburg as a center of business development due to the synergy between the city and the university to offer a low-cost center for doing business with a large highly skilled workforce. Rexburg is home to Brigham Young University-Idaho, the largest university in the state. Together with our community partners, we welcome NAVEX Global and hope to provide them with a vibrant, thriving talent pool that will continue to drive their business growth and strengthen Rexburg’s business sector.”


About NAVEX Global

NAVEX Global’s comprehensive suite of ethics and compliance software, content and services helps organizations protect their people, reputation and bottom line. Trusted by 95 of the FORTUNE 100 and more than 12,500 clients, our solutions are informed by the largest ethics and compliance community in the world. For more information, visit www.navexglobal.com.

Then and now: Community, college have seen changes

Then and now: Community, college have seen changes

Bonneville County’s population has grown by more than 40,000 residents, a 55 percent jump since 1990.

Idaho Falls has grown from 43,973 residents in 1990 to 59,184 in 2015 and Ammon has nearly tripled in size from 5,002 residents to 14,960 over the same time period.

Bonneville County is one of the state’s fastest growing counties, growing at double the rate of the U.S. population on the whole, according to an impact study from Research & Business Development Center in Rexburg.

The city of Idaho Falls’ 2010 comprehensive plan predicts the city will reach a population of 80,890 residents and the county’s population will grow to 147,073 by 2025.

On May 16, Bonneville County voters will decide whether to convert Eastern Idaho Technical College into a community college. They rejected a similar proposal in 1991. But much has changed in the past quarter century.

The cost of college attendance has increased dramatically. At Idaho State University, tuition and fees were $1,936 in 1990, according to an October 2014 report from Idaho Center for Fiscal Policy. For the 2016-17 academic year they were $7,036, according to the isu.edu website. That’s an increase of 363 percent.

Between 1990 and 2013 state funding for colleges and universities decreased from 86.9 percent of total funding to 53.3 percent, while the share paid by tuition and fees rose from 13.1 percent to 46.7 percent, the Idaho Center for Fiscal Policy reported.

A recent analysis from Student Loan Hero shows the average 2016 college graduate left school with $37,172 in student loan debt. Average student loan debt has risen 453 percent since 1990 when it was $8,200.

Lowering college costs and increasing employment opportunities are two big selling points for creating a local community college. The proposed community college would allow Bonneville County students to get college credits for $125 per credit hour versus $348 per credit hour at ISU or $170 per credit hour at BYU-Idaho, the proponents’ website said.

“Tuition will be 65 percent less than ISU and more than 20 percent less than BYU-Idaho, resulting in significant savings to local students and their families. That will reduce the burden of student loans and other expenses,” it said.

In 1990, 23.2 million of the nation’s 122.6 million jobs required college degrees — or about 20 percent — according to a Bureau of Labor Statistics report.

“By 2020, 65 percent of all jobs in the economy will require postsecondary education and training beyond high school,” a study by Georgetown University’s Public Policy Institute said. The study projects 165 million U.S. jobs by 2020 and says at least 35 percent — or about 58 million — of those will require a college degree.

In Bonneville County, 26.3 percent of residents have a bachelor’s degree or higher, according to the Census. Since the recession the number of local job openings requiring some college has more than tripled, the proponents’ website said.

Idaho National Laboratory officials are among those supporting the community college measure. A community college can help train the workers the site will need for developing technologies as well as to replace those who are retiring.

“Eastern Idaho will greatly benefit from more training and technology education to support our growing need in skilled labor and certified talent,” Stephanie Cook, INL’s Economic and Workforce Development program manager, said on the proponents’ website. She added that a community college would connect the needs of industry to education to develop more talent — “from welders to radiological technicians and lab technicians.

Zip Kit Homes To Bring 40 New Jobs to Pocatello/Chubbuck Area

 Conner Board
 An announcement was made at the Annual Bannock Development Investors Breakfast Thursday morning.

After discussing the recent success of companies like Amy’s Kitchen and Great Western Malting, they revealed Zip Kit Homes will be joining the Pocatello/Chubbuck community.

Zip Kit Homes is based in Mount Pleasant, Utah and is expanding to our area.

 They build high-quality, specialty modular homes, also known as tiny homes.

The project will start with 20 jobs and increase to 40.

“Taking up some more of the talent that is available in our construction sector, folks that have been experiences and have had careers in building homes are very familiar with the kind of processes this company will need,” explains John Regetz, the

 Executive Director of the Bannock Development Corporation. “So we haven’t had a full recovery in the construction sector, so there is a talent base available for them to utilize.”

The exact location has not been finalized, but Zip Kit Homes plans to be up and running by the end of May

Economic development group grows its staff

Economic development group grows its staff

IDAHO FALLS, Idaho (KIFI/KIDK) – Regional Economic Development for Eastern Idaho (REDI) is rounding out its core staff.
Molly Swallow was named Manager of Investor Relations and Advocacy.  Swallow is a Blackfoot High School graduate with a bachelor’s degree in biology from Idaho State University.  Swallow has been involved in commercial banking since 2002.
“She brings an extensive skill set in working with businesses and has a broad range of contacts in our region.  She will be a tremendous asset to growing Eastern Idaho’s business economy,” said REDI CEO Jan Rogers.
Josh Wise has been an executive assistant at REDI since October, 2015.  He was promoted to Manager of Talent Attraction and Business Development in support of the organization’s business expansion, retention and attraction efforts.
REDI was established in 2015 to promote Eastern Idaho’s 14-county region by bringing business, government, and community leadership together to strengthen the region’s economy through business and talent recruitment, retention and expansion, and diversify the region’s economic base.
Modular homebuilder coming to Gate City, could add up to 40 new jobs

Modular homebuilder coming to Gate City, could add up to 40 new jobs

Modular homebuilder coming to Gate City, could add up to 40 new jobs

  • By Shelbie Harris sharris@journalnet.com

POCATELLO — Economic growth continues in the Gate City area, with a new business, Zip Kit Homes, planning to expand into the Pocatello-Chubbuck area this summer.

With the new business, area residents can expect 20, possibly 40 new jobs, according to a Bannock Development Corporation announcement on Thursday.

Zip Kit Homes owner Chris Jaussi said he expects to finalize contract negotiations on the location of the company’s new manufacturing facility in the Pocatello area over the next two weeks. Jaussi is hopeful to start hiring employees here no later than June 1.

Zip Kit Homes is a division of Timberhawk Homes, located in Mount Pleasant, Utah. With limited space at their small factory in Utah, they have outgrown current capacity and decided Pocatello best matched their business needs.

Jaussi chose to move into Eastern Idaho because of the skilled workforce in the area, excellent building locations, transportation systems and proximity to specific markets, all of which met Zip Kit’s business needs.

“We were looking for a place where there was a decent labor force and was a good mid-sized city, something that wasn’t too expensive,” Jaussi said. “And Pocatello came up on the radar. Because of the interest in our homes in the areas around Jackson Hole and other expensive mountain areas, we thought it would be nice to be closer to those locations.”

Jaussi added that the business will start by hiring a handful of new employees and as business demands increase, the number of new employees could reach 40. Further, wages will start in the mid-teens and rise with more qualifications.

The team at Zip Kit Homes have been involved in the construction industry for decades.

“We are a group of general contractors who have built many homes and apartments in the past,” Jaussi said. “We transitioned into building panelized construction. And it was in 2008 that we had this factory down in Mount Pleasant, but there was no new construction going on.”

More recently, Zip Kit Homes and Jaussi’s team decided to focus their efforts on small, precision-built, prefab homes. This allows the company to maintain high quality and keep costs low.

“People often confuse modular housing with manufactured housing,” Jaussi said. “Manufactured homes are built to a different building code, which would be like a double-wide or single-wide trailer. The homes we build are not trailers. We build the exact same building code as any other house or apartment building. It’s built to the same standard as any site-built home and we try to do them more energy efficient.”

Jaussi said he believes there is big trend right now in which younger people can’t buy homes because they are too expensive.

“In the future, I think there should be a number of developments where people can buy a really nice, modern home that’s only 700 square feet. If you can get that on land for under $100,000, I think that’s a big untapped market.”

He continued, “I think that the millennial generation would rather live in a small house and have a lot more freedom than live in a big house they can’t afford. For married couples and younger people, I think 600 or 700 square feet is a very livable, nice house.”

In addition to bringing more jobs to the area, Jaussi said Zip Kit Homes would like to partner with local contractors or developers.

“Sort of like a dealership agreement,” Jaussi said. “In Pocatello, that’s what we will be more interested in. It would be nice to find a land developer that wants to build a whole neighborhood of smaller, affordable houses. If you’re a general contractor some people might see that as a threat and that they would be competing against us. But I would say we would be more interested in working with them. This can be a win-win for everybody.”

To learn more about Zip Kit Homes, visit www.zipkithomes.com.

Japanese companies commit to Idaho Falls

Japanese companies commit to Idaho Falls

Japanese companies commit to Idaho Falls

Sakae Casting CEO Takashi Suzuki (center) addresses local in the lobby of his Idaho Falls office, the company's first U.S. office. Photo courtesy of Regional Economic Development for Eastern Idaho.

Sakae Casting CEO Takashi Suzuki (center) addresses local in the lobby of his Idaho Falls office, the company’s first U.S. office. Photo courtesy of Regional Economic Development for Eastern Idaho.

Idaho Falls’ sister city relationship with Tokai-Mura, Japan, led to the opening of a Sakae Casting business office March 17 in Idaho Falls. The company is exploring relationships with the Idaho National Laboratory, the University of Idaho and the nuclear and advanced manufacturing sectors.

Sakae Casting opened with four employees. The company, based in Tokyo, specializes in castings for inserting stainless steel pipes into an aluminum casting product necessary for optimal performance of semi-conductors and super computers.

Sakae Casting and Ohzen Precision Machining Cutting are the first two Japanese companies opening office in Idaho Falls. Photo courtesy of Regional Economic Development for Eastern Idaho.

Sakae Casting and Ohzen Precision Machining Cutting are the first two Japanese companies opening office in Idaho Falls. Photo courtesy of Regional Economic Development for Eastern Idaho.

Sakae CEO Takashi Suzuki first visited Idaho Falls in March 2016 on a sister city visit with other business executives.

Another Japanese company, Ohzen Precision Machining Cutting, has its name on the same door as Sakae in Idaho Falls. It’s still in the process of establishing a limited liability corporation in Idaho, said Jan Rogers, CEO at Regional Economic Development for Eastern Idaho, the public-private  economic development partnership for several cities and counties in eastern Idaho.

“They are saying there are a number of companies behind them,” Rogers said. “I’m hoping this is the beginning of a Japanese cluster in Idaho Falls.”

When Suzuki made his first visit, Rogers suggested he attend the U.S. Department of Commerce’s SelectUSA Summit in Washington, D.C., last summer to get a better understanding of investment opportunities in the U.S. Rogers reunited with Suzuki at SelectUSA, which works with economic development teams to attract business investment from foreign companies.

“I think we were able to show them the potential for their company in the region with all the research, science and advanced manufacturing,” Rogers said.

REDI also collaborated with the Idaho Department of Commerce to land Sakae Casting.

NAVEX Global expanding to add 80 more jobs

REXBURG — Ethics and compliance software and services company NAVEX

Global@ today announced that it will expand its operations in Rexburg, Idaho, and will add at least 80 more jobs to meet the demands of the company’s rapidly growing business and expanding global customer base.

The company made the announcement during a press conference held on Wednesday at Hemming Village.

NAVEX Global has begun recruiting for the contact center in Rexburg and is currently accepting job applications. The final employment number will depend on the number of employees who apply for part-time positions. Training for new employees will begin in mid-May. The contact center will begin operations in early June.

“NAVEX Global’s presence in this community began in 2013 with the acquisition of PolicyTech, a high growth software company founded here in Rexburg,” said Bob Conlin, NAVEX Global president and CEO. “The employees we gained through that acquisition have contributed significantly to our growth and culture. We have been looking for an opportunity to expand operations in this area for some time.”

Among the several positive aspects of the Rexburg location is the concentration of potential job

applicants with multilingual skills, in part due to the proximity of BYU-Idaho. NAVEX Global’s

 international business growth has accelerated in recent years, necessitating a commensurate expansion in multilingual contact center staffing.

“It is with great excitement, but not surprise, that the City of Rexburg announces the expansion of NAVEX Global in our community,” said Rexburg Mayor Jerry L. Merrill. “NAVEX Global, a very forward-thinking company, joins the growing number of businesses that recognize Rexburg as a center of business development due to the synergy between the city and the university to offer a low-cost center for doing business with a large, highly skilled workforce. Rexburg is home to Brigham Young University-Idaho, the largest university in the state.

“Together with our community partners, we welcome NAVEX Global and hope to provide them with a vibrant, thriving talent pool that will continue to drive their business growth and strengthen Rexburg’s business sector.”

For more information about NAVEX Global, visit navexglobal.com.

NAVEX Global expands in Rexburg

NAVEX Global expands in Rexburg

80 to 100 new jobs are expected

REXBURG, Idaho (KIFI/KIDK) – NAVEX Global has announced it is expanding its business operations in Rexburg.  The ethics and compliance software and services company said the expansion would meet its rapidly growing business and expanding global customer base.
The expansion would add between 80 and 100 new employees at a new contact center in Rexburg.  The 3,630 square-foot center is located at 36 Professional Plaza. The company will also add approximately four new pre-sales positions to support its core business.
Based in Lake Oswego, Oregon, the company currently employs about 50 sales, services, and software development people in Rexburg at an office at 346 Grand Loop.  Both offices are within a mile of each other near the Brigham Young University-Idaho campus.
NAVEX Global calls itself the world’s largest provider of whistleblower hotlines and operates contact centers in Charlotte, North Carolina, Norcross, Georgia, and Lisbon, Portugal.  The centers field calls from an incident reporting hotline and administer business-to-business insurance claims.
The company is currently accepting job applications.  The final number of new employees will depend on the number of people who apply for part-time positions. Training will begin in mid-May and the contact center will begin operations in early June.
“NAVEX Global’s presence in this community began in 2013 with the acquisition of PlicyTech, a high growth software company founded here in Rexburg,” said Bob Conlin, NAVEX Global president and CEO. “The employees we gained through that acquisition have contributed significantly to our growth and culture. We have been looking for an opportunity to expand operations in this area for some time.”
Conlin said Rexburg was attractive to the company because of the concentration of potential job applicants with multilingual skills

Software company to open Rexburg call center

Software company to open Rexburg call center

NAVEX Global, an ethics and compliance software and services company, will expand its Rexburg operations by opening a contact center.

The company anticipates creating between 80 and 100 jobs, including part-time positions, a NAVEX news release said. It already has about 50 sales, services and software development employees in Rexburg at its 346 Grand Loop office.

NAVEX Global is the “world’s largest provider of whistleblower hotlines,” the release said. It operates contact centers in Charlotte, N.C., Norcross, Ga., and Lisbon, Portugal.

The 3,630-square-foot contact center will be located at 36 Professional Plaza. Center employees will field calls from the company’s incident reporting hotline and administer business-to-business insurance claims for its NetClaim business unit.

The company’s two Rexburg offices are within a mile of each other near the campus of Brigham Young University-Idaho, the release said.

“NAVEX Global’s presence in this community began in 2013 with the acquisition of PolicyTech, a high-growth software company founded here in Rexburg,” Bob Conlin, NAVEX Global president and CEO, said in the release. “The employees we gained through that acquisition have contributed significantly to our growth and culture. We have been looking for an opportunity to expand operations in this area for some time.”

Rexburg’s concentration of potential employees with multilingual skills was attractive to the company, which has seen its international business growth accelerate in recent years, necessitating an expansion in multilingual contact center staffing, the release said.

“NAVEX Global, a very forward-thinking company, joins the growing number of businesses that recognize Rexburg as a center of business development due to the synergy between the city and the university to offer a low-cost center for doing business with a large highly skilled workforce,” Rexburg Mayor Jerry Merrill said in the release.

NAVEX Global is accepting job applications and will begin training new employees in mid-May. The contact center will begin operations in early June. For information, go to navexglobal.com and click on the “careers” tab.

Planned LDS temple expected to boost Pocatello’s economy

Planned LDS temple expected to boost Pocatello’s economy

She said at least two new hotels began construction soon after.

“From an economic perspective, that was immediately visible,” she said, adding that later, new homes were also built around the temple.

 Rogers said there were many Mormons in southern Idaho and it meant a lot to them to get a temple in their region, but it was something others could enjoy, too.

“It’s just a beautiful picture, coming across the bridge and seeing the temple on the left and the city in front of you,” she said. “It added a lot to the visual landscape of the community as well.”

She calls the time during and after the announcement special. That’s why Rogers, who is now the CEO of Regional Economic Development for Eastern Idaho, was excited to learn about the church’s plans to build a temple in Pocatello.

“It’s so special again for the surrounding communities of Pocatello to have a temple — a place in their community,” Rogers said.

And she thinks Pocatello will see some of the economic advantages that temples have brought to other cities.

Temples — the church currently has 155 operating throughout the world — have helped to drive economic and real estate activities in many areas.

In a 2008 article about the Rexburg Idaho Temple, the Deseret News reported:

“Economic development almost invariably follows the announcement of a new temple in areas heavily populated by Latter-day Saints, with land values in the area rising as developers put up new housing — some of it expensive homes in exclusive neighborhoods — drawing the faithful and their financial resources.”

John Regetz, executive director of Bannock Development Corporation, believes Pocatello will benefit economically from the addition of a temple. At a minimum, there will be more jobs during the construction phase, he said, and once the temple is complete, there will be more visitors coming to the community. And those people will want to eat at local restaurants, shop at stores and stay in hotels.

“All of the retail environment will see a benefit from that,” Regetz said.

Although the church has not yet declared where the temple will be built, Pocatello Mayor Brian Blad has said it’s likely to be built on land east of Satterfield Drive near the city’s northeast border. The City Council annexed nearly 75 acres of that land Thursday.

The church officials he recently met with told him that location is a strong possibility, although a different location could still be selected.

Ted Crandall, owner of the local Papa Kelsey’s, said his restaurant and others on Alameda, Yellowstone and Pocatello Creek could see an increase in customers if the temple is built in that area. Construction workers and future temple visitors will all be looking for places to eat, he said.

“I hope it increases business. I think it will,” he said.

If the temple is built east of Satterfield, Crandall said his home would be located nearby. That would be exciting to him for two reasons. First, he is a Mormon so the temple is special to him. And second, the temple grounds are typically beautiful.

“I would be excited because the church always does an outstanding job with fences and landscaping,” he said.

He’s not the only one who feels that way.

The Arizona Republic reported in 2009 that the Twin Falls temple not only attracted major chain hotels, but it also increased the values of properties near the temple. The newspaper says demand for homes became high as soon as the site was announced.

“As the focal point of the Mormon faith, a new temple tends to raise property values because church members like to live nearby. And for those outside the faith, temples have a reputation of being good neighbors and can anchor the long-term quality of an area,” the Arizona Republic reported.

Mormon officials say temples can positively affect neighborhood property values even during a difficult economy based on worldwide experiences.

While studies have shown that temples can, but don’t always, lead to increased property values of homes, a study published in 2003 by The Foundation for Apologetic Information & Research, a nonprofit that strives to provide well-documented responses to criticisms of the LDS church’s beliefs, doctrines and practices, determined that temples don’t make properties unmarketable.

 In that study, Steven J. Danderson, a Mormon as well as an adjunct professor of finance at Saint Leo University and an adjunct professor of economics and international management at the University of Phoenix, examined 207 homes within two miles of a temple in the cities of Boston, Massachusetts, Orlando, Florida, and Raleigh, North Carolina.

“The sale prices of private real estate near the three LDS temples in this study show fairly conclusively that the presence of the temple does not make a house unmarketable (under any understanding of the term). In cases where the temple would seem to have added value to local homes, it also suggests that the larger the temple is (i.e. the greater the local impact), the more value is added,” according to the study.

Danderson speculates on several reasons why temples may make for good neighbors. He says they are beautiful buildings with immaculate gardens and lawns, and they draw respectful visitors. They also have limited uses when compared to other religious buildings that may regularly host daycare centers or large meetings.

Temples, which church officials say are used for marriages, baptisms and other ceremonies that unite families together for eternity, are constructed with high-quality materials and follow rigorous building standards.

“The high building standards are in place for two main reasons: first, Latter-day Saints believe their temples are among the holiest places on earth and tributes to God; second, the Church builds these temples to last hundreds of years,” according to a Mormon Newsroom article, which adds that construction workers involved often consider the projects to be the zenith of their careers.

Greg Johnston, a sales agent for Keller Williams Realty East Idaho, agrees that temples are beautiful buildings and he says their landscaping, which often includes flowers and fountains, is park-like.

“Who wouldn’t want to live next to a park? It’s very nice,” Johnston said.

He’s already heard some people express a desire to live near the temple one day.

Johnston says the temple could also draw some higher-end houses to the area, which the local market could easily absorb.

Gloria Howell, another local real estate associate broker, also believes the temple will positively affect Pocatello in many ways in the future — from real estate, to construction to an increased number of visitors.

“It’s a real blessing,” she said.