INL program ranked No. 5 best energy internship in nation

INL News Release
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Nov. 12, 2019

NEWS MEDIA CONTACTS:

Julie Ulrich, 208-520-1139, julie.ulrich@inl.gov

Sarah Neumann, 208-520-1651, sarah.neumann@inl.gov

INL program ranked No. 5 best energy internship in nation

Idaho National Laboratory’s internship program has been recognized as one of the five best energy internship programs in the nation by Vault Magazine. The ranking is based off student intern feedback provided directly to Vault. Vault surveyed nearly 14,000 current and former interns from more than 130 internship programs asking respondents to rate and review their own internship experiences for the 2020 Best Internships Rankings.

Respondents were asked to rate their internship experiences on a scale of 1 to 10 in six core areas:

  • Quality of Life (office culture, hours, work-life balance, flexibility)
  • Compensation & Benefits (pay structure, subsidized expenses, office space, perks)
  • Interview Process (application process, requirements, number of interviews)
  • Career Development (including four separate ratings for training and mentoring, quality of assignments, real-life experience, networking opportunities)
  • Full-time Employment Prospects (opportunity to obtain a full-time job with this organization)
  • Diversity (including four separate ratings for diversity with respect to women, minorities, LGBT individuals, and other underrepresented groups)

The Best Energy Internships reflect the highest-rated internships among energy companies.

Each year, INL hires hundreds of students from universities around the country and the world to work under the guidance of skilled and talented mentors. These internships enable students to collaborate with experienced scientists and engineers in order to develop innovative solutions to challenging, real-world projects.

INL encourages interns to spend 80% of their time at the lab with their mentor and apply their classroom knowledge to real-life work, and to spend 20% of their time in enrichment activities like workshops or skill-building activities.

“Our University Partnerships team works closely with organizations throughout the Laboratory to assure interns get a rewarding experience. This national ranking shows that our efforts at creating the best experience for students are paying off,” said Dr. Mark Peters, INL director.

About Vault
Vault is best known for its influential rankings, ratings, and reviews on thousands of top employers and hundreds of internship programs. Vault’s rankings and ratings are regularly featured and cited by the New York Times, the Wall Street Journal, Bloomberg BusinessWeek, Forbes, Fortune, Money, and countless other news outlets. Since 1996, Vault has been providing in-depth intelligence on what it’s really like to work within an industry, company, or profession.

About INL

INL is one of the U.S. Department of Energy’s national laboratories. The laboratory performs work in each of DOE’s strategic goal areas: energy, national security, science and environment. INL is the nation’s center for nuclear energy research and development. Day-to-day management and operation of the laboratory is the responsibility of Battelle Energy Alliance.

See more INL news at www.inl.gov. Follow us on social media: Twitter, Facebook, Instagram and LinkedIn.

INL strengthens partnerships with small businesses and exceeds annual procurement goals

INL News Release
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Nov.14, 2019

NEWS MEDIA CONTACTS:

Michelle Goff, michelle.goff@inl.gov, 208-526-1650

Sarah Neumann, sarah.neumann@inl.gov, 208-526-0490

Editor’s Note: A graphic depiction of the funds awarded throughout Idaho is attached for your use.

 INL strengthens partnerships with small businesses and exceeds annual procurement goals

 The U.S. Department of Energy’s Idaho National Laboratory has once again demonstrated a firm commitment to partnering with small businesses by meeting all but one of its small business goals.

At the close of Fiscal Year 2019 on Sept. 30, Battelle Energy Alliance, which holds the INL management and operations contract from DOE, reported spending over $332 million with small businesses. This accounts for 54.9% of INL’s overall business spending, and substantially exceeds the $114 million amount set as a goal at the beginning of the year, which would have accounted for about 51% of INL’s spending.

Not only did INL exceed its overall small business goal, but it also exceeded spending goals with Idaho businesses, spending $222 million in Idaho, for a total of 36.7% percent of overall spending, as opposed to the $181.5 million and 30% goal originally established.

“Our partnerships with Idaho businesses are invaluable to the success of INL’s operations,” said Dennis Newby, the lab’s chief financial officer. “We are fortunate to have such high-quality resources throughout our state to fulfill the day-to-day demands of the lab.”

At the beginning of each fiscal year, new small business goals are negotiated as part of the lab’s DOE contract, to determine what percentage of procurement volume needs to be set aside for small business spending. INL’s contracts with small businesses are designed to provide materials and services needed to achieve its diverse missions, including items such as office supplies, fuels and information technology equipment, as well as construction services and skilled expertise in key research areas. The national statutory requirement for small business procurement is 51%. In both 2018 and 2017, INL hit 59.1% in small business volume, so lab leadership saw this as a very attainable goal. As part of their efforts to achieve statewide procurement goals, the INL Small Business Team travels throughout the state to share opportunities for contracting and partnering to do research, as well as information about proposal writing to increase a business’s chances of receiving an award.

Socioeconomic goals are also set for small, disadvantaged businesses, Historically Underutilized Business (HUB) Zone businesses, businesses owned by women and service-disabled veterans, and businesses in Idaho. In FY-19, INL met five of its six socioeconomic procurement goals. They came close but did not quite meet their service-disabled veteran-owned small business goal.

“I am incredibly proud of INL’s strong commitment to working with small businesses and especially Idaho-based small businesses,” said Stacey Francis, the lab’s Small Business Program manager. “Small businesses are integral to our success, and we are excited to continue these positive partnerships.”

INL is one of the U.S. DOE’s national laboratories. The laboratory performs work in each of DOE’s strategic goal areas: energy, national security, science and environment. INL is the nation’s center for nuclear energy research and development. Day-to-day management and operation of the laboratory is the responsibility of Battelle Energy Alliance.

See more INL news at www.inl.gov. Follow @INL on Twitter or visit our Facebook page at www.facebook.com/IdahoNationalLaboratory.

INL News Release
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Nov. 5, 2019

NEWS MEDIA CONTACTS:
Julie Ulrich, 208-520-1139, julie.ulrich@inl.gov
Sarah Neumann, 208-526-0490, sarah.neumann@inl.gov

Four from INL selected as Women Worth Watching awardees

Four from Idaho National Laboratory have been selected as Women Worth Watching by Profiles in Diversity, a national publication dedicated to promoting and advancing diversity and inclusion in the corporate, government, nonprofit, STEM and higher education sectors.

The list of Women Worth Watching contains leaders from a variety of industries throughout the U.S. and the world. The recognition is designed to recognize and publicly celebrate the achievements of women who are “leading the way to excellence in the workplace, marketplace and the world.”

Each awardee is featured in a full-page highlight in the fall issue of Diversity Journal. Congratulations to the four INL winners:

• Dr. Anne M. Gaffney, chief science officer and Distinguished Laboratory Fellow (p. 40)
• Dr. Monica C. Regalbuto, Nuclear Fuel Cycle Strategy director (p. 33)
• Dr. Erin Searcy, Institutional Planning and Programs director (p. 30)
• Virginia L. Wright, Energy Cyber Portfolio manager (p. 39)

“We’re proud to have four outstanding leaders at Idaho National Laboratory recognized as Women Worth Watching. This national recognition is a testament to the talented workforce we have at INL and encouragement that our inclusive employment policies are making a difference,” said Ron Crone, Materials & Fuels Complex associate laboratory director and Women in Leadership Council executive sponsor.

You can view the full issue of the online magazine issue here. https://issuu.com/diversityjournal/docs/women_worth_watching_2019?fr=sMzUzOTcyNjQ5

INL is one of the U.S. Department of Energy’s national laboratories. The laboratory performs work in each of DOE’s strategic goal areas: energy, national security, science and environment. INL is the nation’s leading center for nuclear energy research and development. Day-to-day management and operation of the laboratory is the responsibility of Battelle Energy Alliance.

Profiles in Diversity Journal, a quarterly publication, is dedicated to promoting and advancing diversity and inclusion in the corporate, government, nonprofit, STEM and higher education sectors. Since 1999, Diversity Journal has helped stimulate organizational change by profiling the visionary leadership, innovative programs, and individual commitments to making it happen.

See more INL news at www.inl.gov. Follow us on social media: Twitter, Facebook, Instagram and LinkedIn.

Idaho National Laboratory, The University of Texas at San Antonio to host national forum on critical infrastructure resilience

Idaho National Laboratory, The University of Texas at San Antonio to host national forum on critical infrastructure resilience

Who We Are

Teresa McKnight – CEO REDI

Teresa McKnight is the CEO of the Regional Economic Development for Eastern Idaho (REDI).  McKnight is an entrepreneurial driven executive with more than 25-years’ experience working with research parks, technology commercialization, business incubation, government relations, business and economic development.  She has a strong background building public-public and public-private partnerships, consulting on strategic economic development and philanthropy initiatives, and moving new ideas to market.  She is passionate about building long-lasting relationships between business, industry, university, government and community.

As CEO of REDI, Ms. McKnight works closely with community partners to promote economic development through expansion of existing business, attraction of new business, and promoting entrepreneurship and talent development in the region.

Prior to joining REDI, Ms. McKnight served as the Director of the State of Utah Incubation Enterprise and Technology Outreach Program.  She led the development of the first statewide incubation program in Utah and negotiated the first-of-its-kind Partnership Agreement between the State of Utah and the U.S. Air Force.

Prior to working for the State of Utah, Ms. McKnight led the development of several large Innovation Districts in three different states that resulted in development of more than 500 acres, recruiting over 100 high-tech companies, creating more than 3500 high-tech jobs, and raising over $250 million in public and private dollars. 

Ms. McKnight has received several honors and awards, including Excellence in Rural Economic Development Award from the Department of Commerce in Washington, DC and the Chamber of Commerce Achievement Award in Business.  She serves on the Idaho Innovation Center Board, is a member of the Energy Communities Alliance (ECA), the International Economic Development Council (IEDC), and the Idaho Economic Development Association (IEDA).

REDI was created in April of 2015 as a public-private partnership to help diversify and strengthen the economies of fourteen counties of Eastern Idaho by retaining and attracting business to the region.  REDI brings business, government and community leadership together to build the region’s economy through retention and expansion of existing industry, attraction of new employers, and diversification of the economic base while promoting talent development, attraction and retention. 

teresam@easternidaho.org

Melissa Rene- Administrative Assistant

With over fifteen years of office management and administration experience, Melissa Rene has been a key player in various corporations. Melissa is a graduate from Broadview University in Salt Lake City and loves to be part of the community where she lives. Melissa is dedicated to her work and enjoys participating in fundraisers for various local projects including an annual triathlon for Afrika Tikkun. Melissa is an Idaho native and is happy to be back living in Eastern Idaho and excited to be part of the REDI organization.

mrene@easternidaho.org

NEW Nav $10,000 Grant Apply by December 20

Nav matches businesses with financing options AND they offer this grant every quarter!

 

Application asks:

 

What your business does.

What challenge you overcame or continue to struggle with in your business.

What you’ll do with the grant funds.

Nav’s Small Business Grant

 

Stop. Think. Connect.

 

The Department of Homeland security has an excellent collection of small business cybersecurity resources.

 

Start with the toolkit here.   

 

Need more help? Call the SBDC for assistance 208-282-4402. 

https://www.dhs.gov/publication/stopthinkconnect-small-business-resources

 

 

REDI CEO Teresa McKnight discusses future of organization By JEFF ROBINSON East Idaho Business Journal

REDI CEO Teresa McKnight discusses future of organization By JEFF ROBINSON East Idaho Business Journal

McKnight has more than 25 years’ experience working with research parks, technology commercialization, business incubation, government relations, business and economic development. She previously has held economic development-related jobs in Utah, Montana and South Dakota. Prior to REDI, she worked as director of Incubation Enterprise and Technology Outreach for the Utah Science Technology and Research Initiative at the University of Utah.

REDI works to “build the region’s economy through retention and expansion of existing industry, attraction of new employers, and diversification of the economic base while promoting talent development, attraction and retention,” according to its website.

McKnight recently participated in an email question-and-answer with the East Idaho Business Journal.

East Idaho Business Journal: What do you think are the most significant achievements for REDI so far?

Teresa McKnight: REDI’s main focus is to become a trusted voice in the region. To that end, REDI has produced research supported by data, which identified key industries and clusters central to the region’s growth. Eastern Idaho has a number of exciting business sectors well positioned for the future. Our research has also identified growth opportunities in other sectors such as the SMR and cybersecurity that have high growth potential.

Based on this research, REDI recently completed an economic strategic plan. Because the potential is regionwide, regional cooperation and collaboration is necessary. Fortunately, relationships between REDI, city and county representatives, higher education leadership and business and industry leaders continue to strengthen. With a solid strategic plan and closer cooperation throughout the region, we will now begin the work necessary to strengthen and market the region.

REDI has also partnered with several organizations around the state of Idaho and nationally. For example, REDI partnered with the Idaho Technology Council to address the growth of a knowledge-based economy in eastern Idaho.

EIBJ: What concrete goals do you aim to accomplish in your first year on the job?

McKnight: Over the past three months I have met with civic, business, and community leaders up and down eastern Idaho’s I-15 Corridor.

I am focused on:

 Moving REDI’s activities to be more targeted and strategic in nature and to base REDI’s services on market-driven data for the industry clusters identified.

 Marketing the competitive advantages of the region and each community within the region.

 Increasing eastern Idaho’s competitiveness by building connections, relationships and partnerships between government, public institutions and private sector in identified strategic areas and activities. This means an understanding of the value chain for each cluster identified, as well as the relationships of the clusters combined with capital, support services, workforce and policies.

 Creating a collaborative regional strategy that “levels the playing field” between the communities, as well as between business and industry.

Allowing region and industry stakeholders to understand the structure and nature of the identified clusters, their strengths and weaknesses in the market and with the competition.

Continued work with local economic development representatives to develop and implement regional initiatives based on the target industry clusters.

 Filling the gaps through business retention, expansion and attraction and workforce recruitment programs.

 Creating better linkages among existing support services and increase services to better meet business needs.

 Providing research and intelligence services, networking, workshops, and site hosting opportunities.

 Most important, work to diversify the economy, increase the number of high-paying jobs, develop and strengthen identified target clusters to ensure return on investment and, on an annual basis, evaluate and benchmark results.

EIBJ: Has the regional economic development model demonstrated that it is superior to the local economic development model that was employed before the creation of REDI?

McKnight: Local economic development efforts are vital to the success of a community. A regional economic development organization like REDI develops the research, data and marketing reach that is not possible at the local level. It also plays an important role in growing regional economies because it provides the ability to bring leadership together to draw upon a larger pool of resources, labor and assets — making individual communities stronger as a unified economic ecosystem.

The benefit of doing business attraction on a regional basis — simply put — will improve eastern Idaho’s ability to compete in a competitive global economy. The decision to expand for an existing company or for a site selector to choose a location is dependent on a strong, local, economic development organization. Those organizations may be community based, city based or county based. REDI works in partnership with these organizations to showcase regional strengths.

EIBJ: Are the area’s other ongoing economic development efforts working in conjunction with REDI or do those efforts divert from REDI’s goals?

McKnight: Working together is imperative. REDI meets on a consistent basis with city and community leaders, as well as regional economic development leaders. REDI takes a leadership role in projects and initiatives that are regional in nature to develop efficient systems to avoid duplication of efforts.

REDI also partners on and supports projects that are developing in individual communities in the region.

Public-public and public-private partnerships are proven models to strengthen regional economic development efforts and build a more sustainable economic ecosystem. When regions progress and succeed, it’s because leaders at all levels come together, unify in efforts, and leverage the assets of their communities to benefit the region.

EIBJ: What lessons did you learn as director of the Utah Incubation Enterprise and Technology Outreach Program that are applicable to your new role?

McKnight: The lessons learned, not just in my previous position with the state of Utah, but in the past 25 years I have spent working in economic development is patience. It takes time to build a strong economic ecosystem. Leadership always wants to see quick results. They look at neighboring states that are succeeding and want the same results. Helping leaders understand and appreciate the time and work it takes behind the scenes, and helping them remain patient through the process to reach success, is one of the greatest lessons I have learned in my career path to-date.

EIBJ: Has the recent turnover at REDI’s helm — three CEO leaders in less than two years — slowed the organization’s growth or goal achievement?

McKnight: Change in leadership always impacts an organization on some level … With Jan’s past experience in economic development, and Dana’s federal, state and local government experience, each played a role in laying the groundwork required to push REDI forward.

I am thrilled to use my experience to build upon the great work to-date. To bring forward new programs and initiatives to strengthen eastern Idaho. To recruit, retain and expand business and industry in the sectors we have identified. To partner with universities, colleges, business and industry to develop new workforce recruitment and retention programs, and to work with entrepreneurs and incubation organizations to develop new ideas, expand research capabilities, and build a strong entrepreneurial ecosystem in the region.

EIBJ: What significant challenges still must be overcome for REDI to be considered a success?

McKnight: REDI has developed an Economic Strategic Plan, which is a living document that addresses workforce needs, education, access to jobs, transportation, broadband, employer needs and partnerships required to advance collaboration efforts and address regional issues. The plan sets the foundation. The plan will be refined and updated.

Economic development is about setting a nimble set of strategies that are constantly updated and realigned, in partnership with, and in support of both the public and private sectors.

East Idaho’s economy is strong. We are witnessing rapid changes in several technology sectors (ag, advanced manufacturing, energy, health care and information technology). The benefits of REDI, and the development of a regional economic development strategic plan to steer the course and generate results, demonstrates eastern Idaho’s desire to maximize economic growth and protect the prosperity of future generations to come.